Sunnybank Veterinary Clinic (07) 3345 6689

Interpreting your pet's blood results

Interpreting your pet’s blood results

 

Your pet has had a pre-anaesthetic blood panel run in house. We use this blood test to ensure that vital organs are functioning correctly. The following information will guide you through how we run the test and what the results may indicate.

Taking a sample:

We have taken a small sample (approximately 1ml) of blood. You may notice we have clipped a small section of fur. Clipping the fur lets us visualize the vein more easily as well as allows us to thoroughly clean the area to prepare for taking the blood.

The sample is placed in a small collection container that will prevent it from clotting. We need to the blood like this to be able to successfully test the correct cells.

Running the Test

We use a specialised in house laboratory so that we can process your pet’s blood results quickly. We then tailor the anaesthetic based on these results. This means we can make our anaesthetics as safe as possible. The more information we have about the health of your pet, the safer the anaesthetic.  

Interpreting the results

GLU (Blood glucose): Changes in blood glucose can be associated with stress, not eating, or a range of diseases. Your veterinarian will discuss any concerns with you.

UREA: This enzyme is excreted by the kidneys. Abnormal results can occur with not eating, dehydration, renal insufficiency or liver disease.

CREA: This enzyme is excreted by the kidneys. Abnormal results may indicate not eating, dehydration, renal insufficiency or problems in the urinary tract.

TP: Total protein may indicate a range of things including dehydration, liver or kidney disease, and/or anaemia.

ALT: This enzyme is associated with liver function and elevations may be associated with liver disease, stress, or inflammation anywhere in the body.

ALKP: This enzyme is associated with the liver and bone. Elevations may be associated with liver or bone damage, stress, or inflammation anywhere in the body.

PCV: Packed cell volume indicates the ratio of red blood cells in the blood. A low result may indicate that the patient is anaemic where a high PCV may indicate dehydration.

D Lane, B Cooper, L Turner, BVSA Textbook of Veterinary Nursing 4th edition, 1994 Gloucester GL2 2AB.

Follow ups

Using these results, the veterinarian is able to identify any potential health concerns with your pet before administering drugs and medications. Further testing may be required in the form of urine tests or follow up blood tests to diagnose and/or monitor conditions. Your veterinarian will discuss any concerns and can answer any questions you may have regarding your pet’s health.